PHYSICS 207            Elec & Mag   Winter, 2006

Instructor: Bruce Craver
Office: SC 101D           Office Hours:   Mon and Wed 2-3:30, Tues 10-11:30, Thurs 9:30-11
Phone: x92219 (229-2219 from off campus)
E-mail: Bruce.Craver@notes.udayton.edu
Homepage: http://www.udayton.edu/~physics/bac/bac.htm

TEXT: Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Extended Ed. , 5th Ed. - Paul A. Tipler and Gene Mosca

Note: The material here will occasionally be updated.  Please check here periodically.

Physics 207 is an introduction to electromagnetism, the theory of the behavior of electric and magnetic fields E and B .  The major topics are:

 Throughout, an attempt will be made to develop the new concepts, and to then illustrate them by solving sample problems. Where possible use is also made of actual demonstrations and computer software to carry out simulations and to provide graphical representation of subjects. Generally, to scientists and engineers true understanding of this material is reflected in the ability to solve problems. The objective is to be able to apply these definitions and laws to analyze new situations, and to be able to make predictions.   This requires not only sound mathematical skills but also a clear understanding of the fundamental concepts.  Development of these skills requires a sustained effort.   The following is a list of suggestions on how to study physics that I think can help improve understanding and performance.

1.  Read the material before it is discussed in class.  This introduces you to the definitions and terms used, some of which are words you use in everyday life, but which have specialized, and sometimes different, meanings in physics.
2.  As you read (and reread) the text write out the details of the examples in the text.  The examples are your first illustrations of how to use the principles presented in the reading.  Do not do this with the goal of memorizing the example, but rather understanding which principles or laws are employed, and how each step follows from the preceding ones.  If there are points you do not understand note them, and ask your instructor about them.
3.  Work on the homework problems on a regular basis, before they are discussed in class.  Here you have the chance to apply your understanding in tackling a new problem.  This is the ultimate goal, but it requires practice.  Although there is no single prescription for solving all problems there are some aids.
 (i)  For most problems it is beneficial to draw a diagram representing the problem and the information given.
 (ii) In general, the solution will involve relating variables through several relations.  I find it helpful to first write out each of  these equations, regardless of how simple it may be, and then to combine them to solve for the quantitiy desired.  It is  better to work in more short steps rather than a few larger ones.
 (iii) In addition, I find that it is often advantageous to solve a problem algebraically, and to put in numbers only at the end.   Numbers quickly lose their meaning when many appear in a calculation, whereas algebraic variables are more easily  identified, especially in conjunction with a good diagram.  This makes it easier to check your work. Finally, an algebraic  solution is a solution for all choices of numerical values of the variables.  It is not necessary to redo the entire problem if  values of some of the quantities are changed.  Furthermore, an algebraic solution can easily be rearranged to solve for  different quantities.
 

GRADING: Grades will be determined on the basis of the number of points earned out of a maximum of 650 points distributed as follows: 4 100­point exams to be given during regular class periods, a 150­point comprehensive final, and 100 points for  unannounced quizzes/homework.  The university grading system now includes A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D an F.  The following table lists the cut-offs for the various grades.
 
 

    A     A-    B+      B      B-      C+      C     C-      D       F
  93%     90    87      83      80      77     73     70     60  < 60 

In some cases I may announce modified cut-offs, but they would never be higher than the scale above.  Anyone sending an email to me received no later than 5 PM Thursday, 05 Jan.,  giving the correct date for exam 3 will have one per cent added to their semester class average.

 The hourly exams generally consist of three or four problems, and four to six multiple choice questions.  A summary of equations will be provided on each test.  The exams are therefor not designed to test memory, or ability to substitute numbers into an equation, but rather the ability to apply the concepts to analyze information and make predictions.

MAKE-UP:    Make-up exams for excused absences will be taken at the end of the term at a time and location to be announced.  You must see the instructor as soon as possible to determine whether an absence is excused.

IMPORTANT DEADLINES (Winter term, 2006):
Tue 10 Jan   - Last day for late registration, to change grading options and schedule.
Wed 25 Jan  - Last day to withdraw without record.
Wed 22 Mar - Last day to withdraw with record of W.
Fri, 05 May  -  SC128  FINAL EXAM 12:20-2:10  EVERYONE IS EXPECTED TO TAKE THE FINAL AT THE SCHEDULED TIME SO PLAN ACCORDINGLY.

ASSIGNED PROBLEMS:
Chp. 21 - 6, 7, 30, 31, 34, 35, 41, 43, 44, 53, 55, 74, 78, 85
Chp. 22 - 18, 26, 29, 32, 33, 34, 39, 48, 50, 58, 59, 61, 65
Chp. 23 - 2, 6, 14, 21, 23, 24, 27, 30, 37, 42, 50, 53, 54, 55, 77
Chp. 24 - 8, 17, 20, 29, 31, 32, 37, 39, 41, 59, 67, 92
Chp. 25 - 5, 8, 12, 26, 30, 33, 38, 48, 52, 70, 76, 79, 80, 82, 84, 94, 97, 116
Chp. 26 - 20, 24, 27, 33, 38, 44, 58, 61, 80
Chp. 27 - 10, 28, 32, 33, 51, 52, 55, 64, 69, 70, 72, 100, 105
Chp. 28 - 2, 4, 9, 18, 22, 23, 24, 25, 27, 28, 29, 33, 39, 45, 70, 73, 75, 85, 96
Chp. 29 - 4, 6, 25, 28, 31, 40, 45, 47, 62, 68, 75, 76, 80, 81, 86, 93
Chp. 30 - 15, 17, 35, 36, 42, 50, 52, 56, 57, 58, 62
 

PHYSICS 207- TENTATIVE SCHEDULE - WINTER 2006 -  CHAPTERS TO BE DISCUSSED
 
Week of
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Jan 02-06 02 03 04      21
     First day of classes
05 06      21
Jan 09-13 09      21 10
  Last day  change schedule or 
  grade opt
11      21 12 13      22
Jan 16-20 16  HOLIDAY 17 18      22 19  20      22
Jan 23 - 27 23      22
  Last day change first term grades
24 25      23
    Last day W  w/o record
26 27      23
Jan 30- Feb 03 30 31  T1(21-22) 01      23 02 03   23/24
Feb 06-10 06      24 07 08      24 09 10      24
Feb 13-17 13      25 14 15      25 16 17      25
Feb 20-24 20   25/26 21 22      26 23   24      26     
Feb 27-Mar 03 27 28  T2(23-25) 01      26 02 03      26/27
Mar 06-10 06      27 07 08      27
    1st yr Mid-term grades due
09  10      27
Mar 13-17 13 HOLIDAY 14 HOLIDAY 15 HOLIDAY 16 HOLIDAY 17 HOLIDAY
Mar 20-24 20   27/28 21 22      28
   Last day W w/record
23 24      28
Mar 27- 31 27 28  T3(26-27) 29      28 30 31      29
Apr 03-07 03      29 04 05  Stander Symposium
  Alternate Day of Learning
06  07      29
Apr 10-14 10 11  T4(28-29) 12      30 13 HOLIDAY 14  HOLIDAY
Apr 17-21 17 HOLIDAY 18 19      30 20 21      30
Apr 24-28 24      30 25 26
 Last day of class
27  Study Day 28  Study Day
May 01-05 01  02  03 04 05    FINAL
(12:20-2:10, SC128) 

 

Click on one of the following links to view an old exam.

 Exam 1       Exam 2         Exam 3          Exam 4
 

Craver Homepage

UD Physics Homepage