PHYSICS 206                                Winter 2008

Instructor: Bruce Craver
Office: Sherman 101D
Office Hours: Mon. 10-11, 3-4, Tue.10:30-11:30, Wed. 2:30-3:30, Thu 10:30-12
Phone: x92219 (229-2219 from off campus)
E-mail: Bruce.Craver@notes.udayton.edu

TEXT: Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Ext. , 6th Ed. - Paul Tipler and Gene Mosca

Physics 206 is an introduction to classical or Newtonian mechanics, the study of the universal laws governing the motion of matter. The major topics are:

 Throughout, an attempt will be made to develop the new concepts, and to then illustrate them by solving sample problems. Where possible use is also made of actual demonstrations and computer software to carry out simulations and to provide graphical representation of subjects. Generally, to scientists and engineers true understanding of this material is reflected in the ability to solve problems. The objective is to be able to apply these definitions and laws to analyze new situations, and to be able to make predictions.   This requires not only sound mathematical skills but also a clear understanding of the fundamental concepts.  Development of these skills requires a sustained effort.   The following is a list of suggestions on how to study physics that I think can help improve understanding and performance.

1.  Read the material before it is discussed in class.  This introduces you to the definitions and terms used, some of which are words you use in everyday life, but which have specialized, and sometimes different, meanings in physics.
2.  As you read (and reread) the text write out the details of the examples in the text.  The examples are your first illustrations of how to use the principles presented in the reading.  Do not do this with the goal of memorizing the example, but rather understanding which principles or laws are employed, and how each step follows from the preceding ones.  If there are points you do not understand note them, and ask your instructor about them.
3.  Working on the homework problems on a regular basis is the single most imortant thing a student can do to master the material in the course. It is most beneficial  to attempt this before they are discussed in class.  Here you have the chance to apply your understanding in tackling a new problem.  This is the ultimate goal, but it requires practice.  Although there is no single prescription for solving all problems there are some aids.
 (i)  For most problems it is beneficial to draw a diagram representing the problem and the information given.
 (ii) In general, the solution will involve relating variables through several relations.  I find it helpful to first write out each of  these equations, regardless of how simple it may be, and then to combine them to solve for the quantity desired.  It is  better to work in more short steps rather than a few larger ones.
 (iii) In addition, I find that it is often advantageous to solve a problem algebraically, and to put in numbers only at the end.   Numbers quickly lose their meaning when many appear in a calculation, whereas algebraic variables are more easily  identified, especially in conjunction with a good diagram.  This makes it easier to check your work. Finally, an algebraic  solution is a solution for all choices of numerical values of the variables.  It is not necessary to redo the entire problem if  values of some of the quantities are changed.  Furthermore, an algebraic solution can easily be rearranged to solve for  different quantities.

GRADING: Grades will be determined on the basis of the number of points earned on 4 100­point hourly exams to be given during regular class periods, a 150 point comprehensive final, and 100 points for unannounced quizzes/homework. The lowest of the four hourly exam scores will be dropped. Anyone missing an exam will receive a zero and that will be treated as the lowest score. There are no make-ups for missed quizzes but the lowest quiz will be dropped. The final will be all multiple-choice but will still consist of short problems. The class grade will be determined on the basis of the number of points earned on exams and quizzes out of a maximum of 550 points. The university grading system includes A,A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D an F.  The following table lists the cut-offs for the various grades.
 
 

    A     A-    B+      B      B-      C+      C     C-      D       F
  93%     90    87      83      80      77     73     70     60  < 60 

In some cases I may announce modified cut-offs, but they would never be higher than the scale above.  Anyone sending an email to me received no later than 11 AM Tuesday, 08 Jan.  giving the correct date for exam 3 will have 1 per cent added to their semester class average. Be sure to indicate the email subject heading as PHY 206.
 

FINAL EXAM:  Mon. 28 Apr.,  2:30-4:20, SC107.     EVERYONE IS EXPECTED TO TAKE THE FINAL AT THE SCHEDULED TIME SO PLAN ACCORDINGLY.
 

PROBLEM ASSIGNMENTS: C2 - 16, 32, 35, 39, 43, 44, 51, 55, 65, 79, 84, 101, 112, 121
C3 - 7, 27, 51, 56, 69, 70, 76, 77, 84, 102, 115 and C1 - 53, 57, 74
C4 - 13, 22, 37, 47, 49, 52(b, c only), 59, 62, 70, 76, 80, 82, 87, 94
C5 - 4, 16, 39, 41, 45, 47, 51, 79, 81, 87, 89, 94, 103, 105, 116, 127
C6 - 19, 27, 31, 39, 43, 54, 65, 70
C7 - 22, 23, 25, 29, 33, 34, 39, 46, 51, 63, 65, 69, 94
C8 -
C9 -
C10-
C11-
C12-
C14-
  
PHY206   TENTATIVE  SCHEDULE - WINTER, 2008
This schedule is subject to change so check this site or watch for announcements made in class or by email.
   

Week of Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Jan 07-11 07      2
First day of classes
08     2 09      2 10 11      2
Last day change schedule or grade opt          
Jan 14-18 14      2           15 16      3 17 18      3          
Jan 21-25 21  HOLIDAY 22
Last day change first term grades
23      3 24 25      4
Jan 28 - Feb 01 28      4
Last day W  w/o record
  
29 30 T1(2-3) 31 01      4
Feb 04-08 04      5           05 06     5  07 08      5 
Feb 11-15 11      6  12 13     6 14 15      6
Feb 18-22 18      7           19 20  T2(4-6) 21 22      7 
Feb 25-29 25      7            26 27      8  28 29      8
Mar 03-07 03      8 04 05      9
1st yr Mid-term grades due
06 07      9
Mar 10-14 10      9 11 12 T3(7-9.4) 13 14      10
Mar 17-21 17 Mid-Term/ Easter Break 18 Mid-Term/ Easter Break 19 Mid-Term/ Easter
Break
20 Mid-Term/ Easter Break 21 Mid-Term/ Easter Break
Mar 24-28 24  Classes resume at 4:30 PM 25 26      10     Last day W w/record 27 28      10
Mar 31- Apr 04 31      10     01 02      11 03 04      11
Apr 07-11 07      11 08

09     Stander Symposium Alternate Day  of Learning 

10  11      12 
Apr 14-18 14      12  15 16 T4(9.4-12) 17 18      14 
Apr 21-25 21      14 22      14 23 24  
 Last day of class
25  Study
Day
Apr 28- May 02 28   FINAL (2:30-4:20) 29 30 01 02 
May 05-09 05  06 07 08 09

 

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