PHYSICS 202                                 Spring 2010

Instructor: Dr. Bruce Craver
Office: Sherman 101D      Office Hours:
Monday 10:30-Noon; Tuesday 2-4; Wednesday 11-12; Thursday 3-4
Phone: x92219 (229-2219 from off campus)
E-mail: Bruce.Craver@notes.udayton.edu

TEXT: Physics, 6th Ed. - Douglas Giancoli

Throughout this course an attempt will be made to develop the new concepts, and to then illustrate them by solving sample problems. Where possible use is also made of actual demonstrations and computer software to carry out simulations and to provide graphical representation of subjects.  As in all areas of knowledge a deeper understanding of science involves more than a simple recitation of various facts or laws.  It entails the ability to formulate reasoned arguments based on sound principles. Our objective is to be able to apply these definitions and laws to analyze new situations, and to be able to make predictions.  This requires not only sound mathematical skills but also a clear understanding of the fundamental concepts.  Development of these skills requires a sustained effort.   The following is a list of suggestions on how to study physics that I think can help improve understanding and performance.

1. Students should realize there is not sufficient time to discuss every covered section in class, so it is imperative that students read the material before it is discussed in class.  This introduces you to the definitions and terms used, some of which are words you use in everyday life, but which have specialized and sometimes different meanings in physics.
2.  As you read (and reread) the text write out the details of the examples in the text.  The examples are your first illustrations of how to use the principles presented in the reading.  Do not do this with the goal of memorizing the example, but rather understanding which principles or laws are employed, and how each step follows from the preceding ones.  If there are points you do not understand note them, and ask your instructor about them.
3.  Work on the homework problems on a regular basis, before they are discussed in class.  Here you have the chance to apply your understanding in tackling a new problem.  This is the ultimate goal, but it requires practice.  Although there is no single prescription for solving all problems there are some aids.
 (i)  For most problems it is beneficial to draw a diagram representing the problem and the information given.
 (ii) In general, the solution will involve relating variables through definitions and physical laws.  I find it helpful to first write out each of these equations, regardless of how simple it may be, and then to combine them to solve for the quantity desired.  It is better to work in more short steps rather than a few larger ones.
 (iii) In addition, I find that it is often advantageous to solve a problem algebraically, and to put in numbers only at the end.  Numbers quickly lose their meaning when many appear in a calculation, whereas algebraic variables are more easily identified, especially in conjunction with a good diagram.  This makes it easier to check your work. Finally, an algebraic solution is a solution for all choices of numerical values of the variables.  It is not necessary to redo the entire problem if values of some of the quantities are changed.  Furthermore, an algebraic solution can easily be rearranged to solve for different quantities.
 

GRADING: Grades will be determined on the basis of the number of points earned out of a maximum of 550 points distributed as follows: 3 100-point exams to be given during regular class periods, a 150-point comprehensive final, and 100 points for unannounced quizzes/homework. The following table shows the cut-offs for the various grades.
 
 

    A

    A-

   B+

     B

     B-

     C+

     C

    C-

     D

      F

  93%

    90

   87

     83

     80

     77

    73

    70

    60

 < 60 

 

EXAMS: Exams are during normal class period in the usual classroom. An equation sheet will be provided for the exam containing the definitions and physical laws, largely those equations in the end of chapter summary for each chapter. Students are not to write on these sheets since they will be collected and re-used throughout the term. Students are permitted to use only electronic calculators and the equation sheets provided during an exam. Ipods, cell phones and head phones are not allowed during an exam.

Anyone missing an exam will be given a grade of zero.  Students missing an exam must see me as soon as possible.  Students are expected to come to my office to see me about an excused absence.  Students with an excused absence will be allowed to take a MAKE-UP EXAM to be given near the end of the semester.  There will be no make-up for quizzes. The lowest quiz score will be dropped. There are no extra credit assignments.
 

Any student having difficulty with the course should come see me for help as soon as possible.  Feel free to stop in either during office hours or at other times when I am in my office.  Additionally there is free tutoring available from the Ryan Harris Learning Teaching Center (LTC).  Information is available at  Tutoring Schedule .

Occasionally I may reach you by email.  I will communicate with you only through the email address listed in the University Address Book.  You may change your email address by going to http://address.udayton.edu and following the instructions.  I believe this ensures mail sent to your notes address will be forwarded to whatever address you introduce at this web site.  I should point out that your Lotus notes address in the form ***@notes.udayton.edu can be accessed from anywhere once you are on the web, but you will need to learn how to do that.  If you do not make this change at the above site and employ another email address you are still responsible for checking assignments or announcements which are mailed to you at the address listed in the University Address Book.

Friday 30 April  -  12:20-2:10   FINAL EXAM  EVERYONE IS EXPECTED TO TAKE THE FINAL AT THE SCHEDULED TIME SO PLAN ACCORDINGLY.

PROBLEM ASSIGNMENTS: Q= questions; P= problems; GP= general problems
C16 - Q: 4, 8, 13, 14, 15, 18,    P: 4, 7, 11, 12, 13, 15, 17, 23, 25,28, 29, 41    GP: 67
C17 - Q: 1, 2, 3 P: 1, 2, 4, 9, 10, 12, 16, 19, 21, 23, 31, 39, 41, 47,   GP: 55, 65, 72
C18 - Q:    P: 6, 7, 11, 29, 31, 34, 39, 43, 45   GP:
C19 - Q: 3, 4, 8, 9, 11   P: 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 23, 24, 27(also find power output of both batteries and power dissipation in each resistor), 31, 37, 38, 50, 51  GP: 83
C20 - Q: 8, 9, 10   P: 1, 4, 12, 17, 36, 41, 49   GP: 69, 84
C21 - Q: 4, 5   P: 6, 7, 12, 13, 15, 17, 31, 35   GP:
C22 - Q: 8   P: 8, 11, 16, 18, 19   GP:
C23 - Q: 13   P: 4, 10, 11, 17, 21, 29, 30, 45, 49, 53, 54, 58   GP:
C24 - Q:  3, 6  P: 3, 9, 13, 17, 23, 27, 39, 42   GP:
C25 - Q:    P: 11, 23, 24, 51, 52   GP:
C26 - Q:    P:    GP:
C27 - Q:    P:    GP:
C28 - Q:    P:    GP:
C30 - Q:    P:    GP:
C31 - Q:    P:    GP:
 

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE -SPRING 2010
This schedule is subject to change so watch for announcements made in class or by email.
 

Week of

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Jan 04-08

04  16

05 

06   16     

07 

08  

Last day reg, change schedule or grade opt 

Jan 11-15

11  17    

12

13  17

14

15        

Jan 18-22

18  NO CLASS

19 

20   18     

21

22        

Jan 25-29

25   19     

Last day W w/o record

26

27 19     

 

28

29        

Feb 01-05

01   20 

      

02 

03  20 

      

04

05     

Feb 08-12

08  E1(16-19)

09

10  21 

  

11

12        

Feb 15-19

15   21 

      

16 

17  22 

      

18

19      

Feb 22-26

22  23 

23

24  23 

      

25 

26    

Mar 01-05

01  NO CLASS 

02  NO CLASS

03 NO CLASS

04 NO CLASS

05  NO CLASS

Mar 08-12

08   24 

      

09 

10 24

Midterm grades

due 4 PM       

11 

12  

Mar 15-19

15  E2(20-23)

16   

17  25

18  

19 

Mar 22-26

22   26

23

24   26/27

25 

26   

Mar 29- Apr 02

29 27

30

31 27/28      

01 NO CLASS

02 NO CLASS 

Apr 05-09

05  NO CLASS

06

07 28         

08

09 

Apr 12-16

12 28/30

13

14 Stander

Symposium

Alternative learning day

15

16 

Apr 19-23

19  E3(24-27)     

20 

21  30/31  

22

23    

Last day of classes   

Apr 26-30

26

27 

28 

29 

30  FINAL EXAM

12:20 2:10

May 03-07

03 

04

Final grades due 9 AM

05

06

07

 

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