Uruguay, is a small country on the southeastern coast of South America. Gently rolling grasslands cover almost all of the interior of Uruguay. Beautiful sandy beaches line the country's Atlantic coast. Most Uruguayans are descended from Spanish settlers who came to the country in the 1600s and 1700s and Italian immigrants who arrived during the 1800s and early 1900s. Spanish is the nation's official language. Montevideo, the capital and the largest city, has about two-fifths of the nation's total population. Uruguay became an independent republic in 1828. During the early 1900s, it developed into one of the most prosperous and democratic nations of South America. But an economic decline during the 1950s and 1960s brought a period of widespread unrest and military rule. Uruguay is once again ruled by an elected civilian government but remains troubled economically.

Montevideo, Uruguay's capital, is the country's largest city by far. It has about one-third million people, or about two-fifths of the country's total population. Montevideo serves as a commercial, political and intellectual center. It is a bustling city with tree-lined avenues, beautiful beaches and parks, impressive monuments and a variety of cultural and recreational opportunities.

About two-thirds of all Uruguayans belong to the Roman Catholic Church. Almost all Uruguayans fifteen years of age or older can read and write. The coastal plains extend in a narrow arc along the Uruguay River, the Rio de la Plata, and the Atlantic Ocean. They cover about a fifth of Uruguay. But most of the nation's population is concentrated in this region. Small family farms and large plantations occupy much of the western and southwestern coastal plains. Beaches, sand dunes, and lagoons make up the Atlantic shore, which has many popular resorts. The interior lowlands cover most of the Uruguay. Vast, grass-covered plains and hills and numerous rivers and streams make this area an ideal place for raising livestock. Sprawling ranches occupy most of the region, and small cities and towns dot the countryside. Uruguay has a mild, humid climate that varies little from one area to another. The country lies south of the equator, and so its seasons are opposite those in the Northern Hemisphere.

The World Book Encyclopedia, World Book, Inc., Chicago, 2004, pgs. 222-228.

 

 


Madonna and Child

Virgin and Child

 


Virgin and Child

 


Adoration of the Kings

 


Virgin and Child

 


Madonna

 

 


Adoration of the Kings and the Shepherds

 


The Nativity

 


The Nativity

 

 

 


Adoration of the Angels

 


Virgin of Trienta y Tres

 

 


Virgin of Trienta y Tres

 

 

 

 


Virgin and Child

 


Annunciation

 

 


Nativity

 

 

 


Virgin and Child

 


Virgin and Child

 


Holy Family

 

 

Return to Mary page