Liturgical
Season
New
Resources
News from the
Marian Library
Marian
 Events
Prayer
Corner
Mary in the Catholic Press Mary in the
Secular Press
News
Archives
Home
 

12/3/08

The Mary Page News items give insight into our interest areas, our outreach, and the many ways people honor Our Lady. We welcome your input and your comments.

 

  News from the Marian Library


Mary in Books, Films and Music

Call For Films and Other Media

The International Catholic and Multimedia Festival in Niepokalanow in Poland is inviting submissions of films and other multi-media projects through December 31, 2008.  For more information, click into warszawa.mazowsze.pl/niepokalanow/index_ang.html or  festiwalniepokalanow.pl/index_ang.html
In the past, our documentary video, All Generations Shall Call Her Blessed, as well as our website, The Mary Page, have received awards at this festival.

Return to Top


Radio Maria from the Marian Library

Francesca Franchina, MS. Ed., a long-time member of the Marianist Family, will be doing a series of Marian broadcasts through the local stations for Radio Maria WHJM (FM 88.7) in Anna, Ohio and WULM (AM 1600) in Springfield, Ohio.  Called "Francesca and Friends: Why Mary?," the program airs every Wednesday from 11:30 AM-12:30 PM EST focusing on what is going on in the world about Mary, how to speak with others about Mary, and Mary in Scripture.

On Wednesday, December 3, 2008, Francesca Franchina speaks with Steve Koob, Founder of the One More Soul Apostolate, Alice Kompar, Catholic wife, mother, teacher, and activist and Retired General and Medical Doctor, Bill Biggerman, regarding Catholic Physicians Encouragement Campaign, regarding teaching on natural family planning vs. artificial (unnatural family planning), history of OMS and its work guarding against the all-out movement of seduction through immorality, and lifestyles/practices contrary to Christian Catholic teaching assailing civilization today. What can families do about this insidiousness and 'in your face' promotion on television, in schools and family clinics?  CALL IN TOLL FREE; PARTICIPATE IN THE PROGRAM (during the live show); 1-866-333-6279.

The broadcast may also be heard on-line at radiomaria.us [Click on the BVMary photo ... Scroll down to RADIO MARIA USA (English) ... Click on the windows icon or whichever media program you have on your PC.].  The web site also provides access to some previous broadcasts.  We'll keep you informed about future programs.  An encore of each show is broadcast Monday night from 8:30-9:30 pm EST one week after the original.

Her series, Through the Tummy to the Heart, airs every Tuesday except the first Tuesday from 5:00-5:45 PM on RADIO MARIA WHJM and also online. The series encores Saturdays from 3:00-3:45 pm.  Tune in 88.7 FM (WHJM) in the northern Archdiocese of Cincinnati and on line at www.radiomaria.us from anywhere in the world. Send email to Francesca with questions, comments, suggestions at fran@866333mary.com. Send email while the programs are going on if you cannot get through or if you are listening outside of the USA. CALL IN TOLL FREE; PARTICIPATE IN THE PROGRAM (during the live show); 1-866-333-6279.

Return to Top


From the Marian Treasure Chest

The Virgin Mary in Eastern Christian Tradition (by Brother John M. Samaha, S.M.)

The Christian traditions of the East and the West evolved in manifold and divers ways.  Theology and worship developed in different modes according to the varying human cultures.   Where do we find the place of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of Jesus Christ, in the Eastern Christian tradition?

On the one hand we find a tremendous richness of Marian thought in the liturgies of the Eastern Church, but on the other hand a virtual absence of specifically Mariological studies in theology.  In the Christian East the understanding and appreciation of the Theotokos, the Virgin Mother of God, developed differently and is not the product of scientific theological reasoning and reflection.  The Mariological experience and piety of the Eastern churches--in union with Rome and separated from Rome--seem to be embodied almost entirely in their liturgical and para-liturgical worship.  We find no prominent theological reflection on the subject, nothing that would parallel the specialized treatises of Western theological studies.  Eastern theology manuals contain no chapters dealing with the place of Mary in the economy of salvation.  The veneration of Mary, which is so central in Eastern prayer life, has not been extensively expressed, analyzed, or evaluated systematically.  Instead, Mary is highlighted in the liturgy and in prayer.

The scarcity of formal theological study about Mary may seem to some a deficiency in Eastern theology.  How can the Eastern Church, which never prays to God or Jesus Christ without at the same time addressing Mary, neglect theologizing about her?  Why has the Eastern theological mind neglected focus on this enormously important aspect of it life and worship?

In the Eastern theological mind the seeming absence of formal study on this subject is seen as an integral part of the "mystery of Mary" in the experience of the Church.  Eastern scholars question whether theology as the rational investigation of the truths of faith is adequate to transpose into precise terms the real content of that mystery.   For them the proper locus of Mariology is in liturgy and in prayer.  This is reminiscent of Prosper of Aquitaine's maxim: Lex orandi, lex credendi.  We pray what we believe.

In the Eastern Christian traditions, Mariology developed through liturgical veneration within the framework of the concomitant feasts; that is, it followed the development of Christology and the Church’s contemplation of the Incarnation.  All Marian devotion--liturgical and popular--remained organically connected to the mystery of Christ.  This has always been their norm and criterion.

For the Eastern spiritual heritage the liturgy is the principal locus of Mariology.  The liturgical expression of piety is often adorned with allegory and symbolism.  This gives rise to questions about the biblical character and justification of these expressions or forms.  Where in the Bible do we find information about Mary’s birth, presentation in the temple, dormition?  Yet these are celebrated as Marian festivals.  Whatever their poetic, liturgical, and hymnographic expressions, all these events are real because they are self-evident.  Mary was born, like every Jewish girl she was taken to the temple, she eventually died.  Simply because such information comes from the Apocrypha does not alter their reality. The Church contemplates the ultimate reality of these events, not the poetic elaborations in the prayers and hymns.

For the Eastern churches worship and liturgy are paramount.  Liturgy is not seen as an action of the community.  Liturgy is the procession or entrance into the eschatological reality of the Kingdom of God.  It is the meeting-place between the world and the Kingdom of God fully realized.  Worship is not the commemoration of a past event, but a participation in the events of salvation themselves, because, although these occurred historically, they also occur outside the category of time.

While this tradition of the East differs from the theological elaboration of the West, it nonetheless belongs to the full catholicity and apostolicity of the Church.

Some in the West have speculated that the Nestorian controversy, which occurred in the Eastern world, may have contributed to the fuller liturgical celebration of the Theotokos in the East.  This development gave the East a more satisfying and habitual expression of devotion to Mary, and would support the notion that the proper locus of Mariology is primarily in liturgy.

The West, lacking such regular liturgical expression, sought other means of elaborating Marian devotion, such as defining privileges and giving impetus to various movements. Both East and West exalt Mary’s role in Christianity, but from different intellectual and formative approaches.

Return to Top


New Exhibit!

Glory Offering: An Artist's Prayer

The Marian Library gallery will show works of Margaret Werlinger [photo at left] from November 18, 2008 through January 15, 2008. For more information, click into the article from UD's Campus Report.

The Marian Library Gallery is located on the seventh floor of Roesch Library.  Free and open to the public, hours are Mon-Fri, 8:30 am - 4:30 pm or by appointment.  Call 937-229-4214.

The Marian Library will also be displaying Nativity scenes in our Gallery, as well as off-campus at Gallery Saint John, and around the state in Ludlow Falls and Akron.

Return to Top


Additional Web Addresses for The Mary Page

In order to make our web site more accessible, The Mary Page may now be reached at the following URLs: lapagedemarie.org; lapaginademaria.org; marypage.org; themarypage.org; marypage.udayton.edu; campus.udayton.edu/mary; and themarypage.net.  The original address on the University of Dayton site, www.udayton.edu/mary, remains active as well.

Return to Top


Web Collaborators

Two important Catholic websites have added The Mary Page to their list of Media Partners.  CatholicWeb.com highlights items from The Mary Page in their section on Catholic News. Catholic.net includes a Mary Channel on their navbar with articles from The Mary Page. Please visit these sites in return.  We expect continued collaboration with them in the future.

Radio Maria broadcasts from Milan Italy, heard in forty-nine countries; WHJM broadcasts out of Louisiana across USA [including FM 88.7, an affiliate station in Anna, Ohio (north of Dayton) and AM 1600, an affiliate in Springfield, Ohio, which air regular Marian talks from UD's Marian Library every Wednesday at 11:30 am EST.]

Return to Top


In keeping with the season, we recommend Advent Poetry by Dr. Virginia M. Kimball as well as a Novena in Preparation for the Feast of Mary's Immaculate Conception.. We have also updated Korean Language News through 12/3/2008 and also posted the Marian Commemorations for December in Korean.

Return to Top


Pope's Schedule for November-January
Source: Zenit (Vatican City), November 21, 2008

Here is a list of the celebrations Benedict XVI will preside over in November through January. The Office of Liturgical Celebrations of the Supreme Pontiff released the agenda today.

NOVEMBER

-- Saturday 29: At 5 p.m. in the Vatican Basilica, First Vespers for the first Sunday of Advent.

-- Sunday 30: First Sunday of Advent. Pastoral visit to the Roman basilica of San Lorenzo for the 1,750th anniversary of the martyrdom of the deacon saint. Mass at 9:45 a.m.

DECEMBER

-- Monday 8: Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. At 4 p.m. in Rome's Piazza di Spagna, homage to Mary Immaculate.

-- Wednesday 24: Vigil of the Solemnity of the Birth of Our Lord. Midnight Mass in the Vatican Basilica.

-- Thursday 25: Solemnity of the Birth of Our Lord. At midday from the central loggia of the Vatican Basilica, "Urbi et Orbi" blessing.

-- Wednesday 31: At 6 p.m. in the Vatican Basilica, First Vespers of thanksgiving for the past year.

JANUARY 2009

-- Thursday 1: Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God and Forty-second World Day of Peace. Mass in the Vatican Basilica at 10 a.m.

-- Tuesday 6: Solemnity of the Epiphany of the Lord. Mass in the Vatican Basilica at 10 a.m.

-- Sunday, 11: Feast of the Baptism of Our Lord. Mass in the Sistine Chapel at 10 a.m., conferment of the Sacrament of Baptism upon a number of children.

-- Sunday 25: Feast of the Conversion of St. Paul the Apostle. At 5:30 p.m. in the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls, celebration of Vespers.

Return to Top


The director and editors of The Mary Page under the auspices of the International Marian Research Institute do not necessarily endorse or agree with the events and ideas expressed in this feature. Our sole purpose is to report on items about Mary gleaned from a myriad of papers representing the secular press.

Setting the Scene
Source: Cleveland Magazine (clevelandmagazine.com), December, 2008

It's a familiar scene--Mary, Joseph and the three wise men gathered beneath a rickety roof to adore the newborn Jesus.

Popularized by St. Francis of Assisi in the fourteenth century, nativities have taken on countless variations as artists throughout the world have offered interpretations of this iconic depiction of the Christmas story.

Through Dec. 28, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens will feature more than forty nativities, borrowed from the Marian Library at the University of Dayton, in its exhibit The Art of the Nativity.

"There is a very social aspect to these nativities," says the Rev. Johann Roten, curator of the more than fifteen-hundred nativities at the University of Dayton. Here's a look at a few. ...

Click here to see the entire article (including pictures of the creches).

Return to Top


You are invited to help us pray for our Prayer Corner intentions.  Please take a look! This site has been updated and enhanced and now allows users to directly submit prayer requests or to volunteer as a prayer partner for these intentions!

Return to Top


Liturgical Season

Marian Commemoration Days

To celebrate the month of December with Mary:

The Mary Page offers a variety of resources inviting study, reflection and meditation.  We also list important Marian dates for each month of the year.  Please see Marian Commemoration Days for the month of December.

Return to Top


Marian Events

Food for the Soul Marianist Style!

Title: Learning from Our Lady of Guadalupe

Date: Tuesday, December 9, 2008, Noon

Location: Kennedy Union Room 310 on the University of Dayton campus in Dayton, Ohio

Sponsored by the Office of the Rector, a light luncheon will be provided.  RSVP required, so call 937-229-2409.

Return to Top


The Mary Page web site is updated frequently. Please stop in again and see What's New.

Return to Archive


Return to The Mary Page

This page, maintained by The Marian Library/International Marian Research Institute, Dayton, Ohio 45469-1390, and created by Kris Sommers , was last modified Friday, 12/05/2008 14:17:43 EST by Michael P. Duricy . Please send any comments to jroten1@udayton.edu.