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9/5/06

Mary Page News items give insight into our interest areas, our outreach, and the many ways people honor Our Lady. We welcome your input and your comments.

 

Liturgical Season

To celebrate the month of September with Mary:

Marian Commemoration Days

Mary Page offers a variety of resources inviting study, reflection and meditation.  We also list important Marian dates for each month of the year.  Please see Marian Commemoration Days for the month of September.

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New Resources

A section on international stamps with images of Mary has been added to our About Mary page.  The latest addition was Argentina.  Expect more countries to follow.

We are in the process of posting extensive new material on Teachings of the Popes and Councils on the Virgin Mary.  The latest addition was Documents up to the Council of Trent.  Expect more sections to follow.  N.B. Javacript must be enabled in your browser!

We have revised our answer to a reader's question, Have people studied the images in the eyes of the tilma of Our Lady of Guadalupe? and also updated our material on the apparitions reported in Fostoria, Ohio.  We have also posted a slide show on Mary Today which was presented by Father Johann Roten at our recent symposium.

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  News from the Marian Library

Current Exhibit

"Madonnas of the Morning Calm," an exhibit of thirty sacred images by Korean artist, O-Sek Bang, will run from May 15 through September 15 at the Marian Library Gallery on the seventh floor of Roesch Library.  The exhibit is free and open to the public weekdays from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm.  To view the display outside of normal operating hours, call 937-229-4254.

Three of these prints may be purchased for $5 each at The Marian Library: Christ the King of Korea; Holy Mother and the Child of Korea; and Mother of Virgins, Mother of Love.  Click here for a virtual exhibit of the entire display.

Creches are also on display in our museum.  Patrons with RealPlayer may also view a streaming video showing the sets which were on display during the 2005 Christmas season.

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Additional Web Addresses for The Mary Page

In order to make our web site more accessible, The Mary Page may now be reached at the following URLs: lapagedemarie.org; lapaginademaria.org; marypage.org; themarypage.org; marypage.udayton.edu; campus.udayton.edu/mary; and themarypage.net.  The original address on the University of Dayton site, www.udayton.edu/mary, remains active as well.

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Web Collaborators

Two important Catholic websites have added The Mary Page to their list of Media Partners.  CatholicWeb.com highlights items from The Mary Page in their section on Catholic News.  Catholic.net includes a Mary Channel on their navbar with Mary Page articles. Please visit these sites in return.  We expect continued collaboration with them in the future.

Also, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has added the Gallery section of The Mary Page to the Exhibits section of their on-line museum, the Plethoreum.

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International Marian Research Institute Course Schedule

IMRI courses for the Summer 2006 semester concluded on July 21.  The course schedule for the Fall semester is now available.

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A Pilgrimage With Mary, the First Disciple

Presenter: Teresa Monaghen, M.A.

Date: Friday, November 17, 2006 - Sunday November 19, 2006

Time: Check-in Friday begins @ 6:30 p.m., first conference @ 7:45 p.m. Retreat concludes Sunday at 1 p.m.

Location: Spiritual Life Center in Bel Aire, Kansas

Cost: Earlybird discount rate, on or before Tuesday, October 3; $120 per person (double occupancy) or $145 per person (single occupancy). After October 3; $138 per person (double occupancy), or $165 per person (single occupancy). Includes $20 non-refundable deposit.

To receive further information click into slcwichita.org/calendar.htm or call 316-744-0167.

Click this link for a list of all of the current Marian Events by geographical position.

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You are invited to help us pray for our Prayer Corner intentions.  Please take a look! This site has been updated and enhanced and now allows users to directly submit prayer requests or to volunteer as a prayer partner for these intentions!

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Apostle John, the Seer of Patmos
"The Wounded and Dead Lamb Conquers!"
Castel Gandolfo, Italy, August 23, 2006

Here is a translation of Benedict XVI's address at today's general audience, dedicated to the Apostle John, whom he presented on this occasion as "the seer of Patmos."

The meditation is part of the series of reflections he is offering on the Church and the apostles.

At the center of the vision that Revelation presents is the extremely significant image of the Woman, who gives birth to a male Child, and the complementary vision of the Dragon, which has fallen from the heavens, but is still very powerful. This Woman represents Mary, the Mother of the Redeemer, but she represents at the same time the whole Church, the People of God of all times, the Church that at all times, with great pain, again gives birth to Christ. And she is always threatened by the power of the Dragon. She seems defenseless, weak.

But, while she is threatened, pursued by the Dragon, she is also protected by God's consolation. And this Woman, at the end, is victorious. The Dragon does not conquer. This is the great prophecy of this book, which gives us confidence! The Woman who suffers in history, the Church which is persecuted, at the end is presented as the splendid Bride, image of the new Jerusalem, in which there is no more tears or weeping, image of the world transformed, of the new world whose light is God himself, whose lamp is the Lamb.

On the Assumption
"Mary Follows Our Steps With Gentle Trepidation"
Castel Gandolfo, Italy, August 16, 2006

Benedict XVI's address at the general audience, held at the papal summer residence of Castel Gandolfo. The Pope dedicated his address to Tuesday's solemnity of the Assumption.

Dear Brothers and Sisters:

Our usual weekly Wednesday meeting is taking place today in the climate of the solemnity of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary. I would like to invite you therefore to turn your gaze once again to our heavenly mother, whom the liturgy presented to us as victorious with Christ in heaven.

This feast has always been greatly cherished by the Christian people since the first centuries of Christianity. As is already known, it celebrates the glorification, including corporal, of that creature whom God chose as his mother, and that Jesus on the cross gave as mother to the whole of humanity.

The Assumption evokes a mystery that affects each one of us because, as the Second Vatican Council affirmed, Mary "precedes with her light the people of God as a sign of hope and consolation" ("Lumen Gentium," No. 68). We are so immersed in everyday struggles that at times we forget this consoling spiritual reality, which is an important truth of faith.

How is it possible to make this luminous sign of hope be increasingly perceived by present-day society? Today there are those who live as if they should never die, or as if all ends with death. Some behave as if man is the sole author of his destiny, as if God did not exist, at times even denying that there is a place for him in our world.

The great successes of technology and science, which have notably improved humanity's conditions of life, do not give solutions to the most profound questions of the human spirit. Only by openness to the mystery of God, who is love, can our hearts' thirst for truth and happiness be satisfied; only the perspective of eternity can give authentic value to historical events and above all to the mystery of human frailty, suffering and death.

On contemplating Mary in heavenly glory, we also understand that the earth is not our definitive homeland and that, if we live constantly oriented to eternal goods, one day we will share in her same glory. For this reason, despite the many daily difficulties, we must not lose serenity or peace.

The luminous sign of the Assumption to heaven shines even more when it seems that sad shadows of grief and violence loom over the horizon. We are sure that, from on high, Mary follows our steps with gentle trepidation, gives us serenity in the hour of darkness and storm, and gives us security with her maternal hand.

Supported by this conviction, we continue with confidence on our way of Christian commitment where providence leads us.

At the end of the audience, the Holy Father greeted pilgrims in several languages. In English, he said:

... Yesterday we contemplated the Virgin Mary's assumption into heaven. This mystery reminds us that our definitive homeland is not here on earth, and that our longing for fulfillment finds complete satisfaction only in eternal happiness. May our mother in heaven, who guides us on our way, inspire us with courage and hope through the struggles of our daily life! I wish you a pleasant stay, and may God bless you all!

Gypsies on 50th Pilgrimage to Lourdes
Lourdes, France, August 21, 2006

The 50th pilgrimage of gypsies to the Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes is taking place through Friday with the participation of some 7,000 people. The "children of the wind" arrived in Mary's city in some 1,300 caravans.

The first pilgrimage of this type took place Aug. 31-Sept. 3, 1957, as an initiative of the gypsies' national chaplains in France, assisted by the Nazarene Sisters of Charles de Foucauld. About 1,500 people participated in that first pilgrimage. They were accompanied, among others, by Father Roger Etchegaray, then the Diocese of Bayonne's chaplain for gypsies. Today and Tuesday, Cardinal Etchegaray, retired president of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, was scheduled to preside over key moments of the pilgrimage.

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The director and editors of Mary Page under the auspices of the International Marian Research Institute do not necessarily endorse or agree with the events and ideas expressed in this feature. Our sole purpose is to report on items about Mary gleaned from a myriad of papers representing the secular press.

Faithful Honor Mary at Indian Lake Shrine
[Source: The Catholic Telegraph (Cincinnati), September 1, 2006]

About 200 of the faithful assisted in the Mass of the Feast of the Assumption of Mary Aug. 16 at Indian Lake's Marian Shrine. The Mass was celebrated at the statue of the Blessed Virgin, called Our Lady of Fatima, erected during the summer of 1964 at Russell's Point. The statue overlooks Indian Lake from St. Mary's Point.

The American Society of Ephesus, founded by the late George W. Quatman, maintains the Our Lady of Fatima Shrine at Russell's Point. Quatman was responsible for the construction of the statue in 1964. St. Mary of the Woods Parish in Russell's Point hosts an outdoor Mass honoring Our Lady of Fatima at the shrine on the Feast of the Assumption.

The late George W. Quatman was responsible for the construction of the statue. Quatman owned the San Juan Ballroom and Amusement Park in Russells Point. The resort was unique in that all proceeds from the enterprise went to charity. The cost of the construction of the shrine came from the operation of San Juan Park.

More than 400 spectators gathered June 28, 1964, for the dedication of the Our Lady of Fatima statue, located at the opening of Russells Point harbor behind the former amusement park. In 1963, Quatman commissioned Bowman and Armstrong Architects to construct the statue in Miami, Fla. His goal was to bring the lesson of the 1917 appearances of Our Lady of Fatima to the Indian Lake area.

The American Society of Ephesus, founded by Quatman, maintains the shrine. The society is also dedicated to the restoration of St. John the Apostle Basilica, the church of Mary and the house of Mary, located in Ephesus, Turkey. The Fatima Shrine will always be maintained by the society through the Quatman family, according to Tony Quatman of Lima, a son of the late George and Evelyn.

The Mass at Indian Lake honors the Virgin Mary's appearance to three children in Fatima, Portugal throughout the summer. About 100,000 people were said to have witnessed the last and most dramatic apparition, commonly called the "Miracle of the Sun," in an area 90 miles overland from Lisbon with no public transportation available.

Quatman chose to locate the shrine on what was known as St. Mary's Point. He built the statue to remind people to pray and do penance as Mary requested at Fatima. The statue stands 43 feet overall, with the figure measuring 191/2 feet in height. Originally, a colored water display graced the base of the monument, 7 1/2 minutes of music played in 15-minute intervals and the statue rotated 360 degrees, but a flaw in the mechanism made repair constant and costly. The statue no longer rotates, but instead permanently faces the lake. The statue is kept locked behind a fence, and most of the time it is easiest to view it from a boat on Indian Lake.

Each year, the St. Mary of the Woods Parish in Russell's Point holds an outdoor Mass to commemorate the apparitions on the Feast of the Assumption. The 2006 Mass was celebrated by Father Harold W. Kist, pastor. Concelebrants were Fathers Gerald Bensman, Patrick Duffy, Anthony Geraci, James Russell, Patrick Sheridan and James Trick.

St. Mary of the Woods Music Ministries Resurrection Chorus, under the direction of Katie Bergman, provided music and a dinner, under the direction of the parish's hospitality committee, followed in the church hall.

Apparition Has Some Official Support
[Source: Our Sunday Visitor, August 27, 2006]

In 1948, Precious Blood Sister Mildred Mary Neuzil (Sister Mary Ephrem), a contemplative nun in Ohio, told her spiritual director that she felt that the Blessed Virgin had been speaking directly to her for more than a decade.  Up to that point, she thought such mystical experiences must be rather ordinary for people of faith.  She soon found out differently.

Eight years later, in a convent in a small Indiana town, Mary allegedly appeared to Sister Neuzil and began to lay out a special plan for America to "further the cause of faith and unity among peoples and nations."  Mary is said to have appeared frequently until the nun's death in 2000.

Today, the apparition known as Our Lady of America, although not formally approved by the Catholic Church, has drawn the intervention of at least a few bishops.  Last February, in Cheyenne, Wyo., Bishop David Ricken held a public display and veneration of a traveling statue of Our Lady of America.

He had invited the statue primarily because Our Lady of the Assumption is the patroness of the Cheyenne diocese and the Blessed Mother "has been so generous in protecting this diocese for many years."  The family in the United States, Bishop Ricken said, "has never needed the intercession of Our Lady more than it does now."

...

Sister Neuzil's former order has dwindled into the Contemplative Sisters of the Indwelling Trinity, and it's rule of life--written by Sister Neuzil--is said to be awaiting approval from Rome.  The new order is not officially recognized by the Diocese of Toledo, where their motherhouse is located.

Where does that leave matters as far as the Catholic faithful are concerned?  Officially, the Church has not begun to study the case, so the purported Our Lady of America visions remain just one of hundreds upon which no formal judgment has been made.

Even if recognition were to be granted, the visions and messages would remain on the level of private revelation, and no Catholic would be bound to accept them.  The Church and its bishops thus remain extremely cautious about any such claims.  The laity would be wise to exercise similar prudence.

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This page, maintained by The Marian Library/International Marian Research Institute, Dayton, Ohio 45469-1390, and created by Kris Sommers , was last modified Tuesday, 09/05/2006 16:41:26 EDT by Michael P. Duricy . Please send any comments to jroten1@udayton.edu.