Madonna
An Exhibition of Marian Art by G. E. Mullan


Exhibited at the Marian Library: July 11 - August 26, 1994
Artist G. E. Mullan has drawn upon many influences in creating artwork which contains a rich vocabulary of imagery. His life in Texas has inspired his many paintings with Southwest overtones, and the time he spent in a Catholic seminary and Benedictine monastery before realizing his calling as a painter has inspired many forms of religious artwork. Mullan, who often draws on the architecture and Moorish influence of Spain, has been inspired by works of Italian fresco artists and Italy; he also uses impressions of Mexico and, of course, the American Southwest in his varied artwork. The GE Mullan Studio is located at: 102 Ripple Creek Road, San Antonio, Texas 78231-1417.

Telephone: (210) 492-5052
FAX: (210) 492-9060

Website: wlp.jspaluch.com/382.htm

[Hope is the Child-Love is the Gardener]
Hope Is the Child - Love Is the Gardener
[Madonna Humilitatis]
Madonna Humilitatis
Mullan and his works have gained renown in this country (exhibitions in select galleries, features in numerous periodicals, annual fundraising shows for organizations such as battered women's shelters) and abroad (currently on display in the Vatican is his work San Antonio de Yanaguana, painted at the request of the twenty-six bishops of Texas for presentation to the Pope during a recent visit). Mullan has maintained a studio in San Antonio for over a decade; there his art and inspiration continue to take new direction and form.

Mullan's work has been described as a "unique watercolor style noted for its lyrical lines set against an ordered and complex geometry of interdependent shapes." Contrasts between well-defined shapes and fluid, soothing watercolors create a visual excitement which calls the viewer to examine more closely the imagery of his paintings. Mullan has concentrated largely on female figures in his work, often portraying them with "flowing, layered, circular lines meeting the harsh, stylized, geometric lines of man." Also common to many of his paintings is the depiction of "earth as woman." While many of his paintings reflect similar themes and organization, each is unmistakably unique. Mullan expresses that "it's very satisfying to come up with new ways to say things. [Lately] there have been more original, one-of-a-kind abstract landscapes incorporating traditional lines from the Indian culture. I explore how far you can go with a given idea or concept." [The Holy Family]
The Holy Family
One of the concepts taking Mullan's work in a new direction of late has been his identifiably religious paintings. In these varied pieces, Mullan successfully combines several traditions and adapts them accordingly - including the Santos figures of the Southwest and Mexico, illuminated manuscripts of Western Europe, and icons and mosaics in the Byzantine style. Many of the works modeled in this unique eclectic style depict the Virgin Mary and other religious figures. These include his La Conquistadora de Tepeyac: Patroness of the Americas, Saint Joseph the Worker, and Lord, When Did We See You ...?. One of his most recent works of the mother and child--loaded with imagery, symbols, and vibrant color--is entitled Desert Madonna; it presents Mary and baby Jesus in a comforting embrace amidst the sand, cacti and mesas of the Southwest.

Mullan's soothing symbolic style of painting is guaranteed to catch one's gaze and keep it there for as long as one notices and finds meaning in the many aspects of the paintings themselves. His works on exhibit here promise visual splendor due to fantastic brushstrokes coupled with timeless religious images.

WORKS DISPLAYED

[Day Blessing]

Day Blessing

Fine Art Posters

Changing Woman's Gift
Day Blessing
Hope is the Child--Love is the Gardener
Pueblo Lullabye
White Buffalo Woman's Gift

Signed and Numbered Limited Editions

La Conquistadora de Tepeyac
Holy Family
Madonna Humilitatis
Ofrenda
Our Lady of Divine Providence

Original Lithograph

Stargatherer


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This page, maintained by The Marian Library/International Marian Research Institute, Dayton, Ohio 45469-1390, and created by J.C. Tierney , was last modified Wednesday, 06/01/2011 16:00:55 EDT by Michael P. Duricy . Please send any comments to jroten1@udayton.edu.